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Seizure Tracker Help > Track > Seizure Logging> Seizure Types

 Seizure Types

Seizure Tracker allows users to identify Seizure events by type. Reports can be created to distinguish effects of treatment and changes in a particular seizure type count. This list represents the available "Seizure Type" options on the Seizure Tracker logging page.

Simple Partial- A seizure limited to a specific area and side of the brain, without loss of consciousness.

Complex Partial- A seizure limited to a specific area and side of the brain, with the possibility of consciousness being lost or impaired.

Secondarily Generalized- A seizure beginning in a specific area of the brain and then progressing into a generalized seizure. It is important to describe the beginning of these seizures to possibly identify a focal region.

Tonic- Muscle stiffening or rigidity.

Clonic- Repetitive jerking motions.

Tonic Clonic- A seizure often referred to as grand mal seizures. These seizures begin with stiffening of the extremities followed by jerking of the extremities and face.

Myoclonic- A seizure with rapid, brief contractions of muscles, usually occurring at the same time on both sides of the body.

Myoclonic Cluster- Same as an individual Myoclonic seizure but happens repetitively fairly close together. Seizure Tracker users have the capability of recording a related event count with this seizure type selection.

Atonic- A seizure with a sudden loss of muscle tone, often resulting in a sudden collapse. These seizures are also known as drop seizures.

Absence- A seizure with a brief lapse of awareness and or staring spell.

Atypical Absence- A seizure with a brief lapse of awareness and or staring spell but can be responsive.

Infantile Spasms (cluster)- Clusters of quick, sudden movements often occurring in children between 3 months and two years but can continue through later years.

*These descriptions should only be used as a guide. If you have further questions about seizure typing please consult with your care giver.
 
 
     
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